We work hard. We deliver.A STORY
BEHIND EVERY BEER

We have a total irreverence for anything connected with society except that which makes the roads safer and the beer taste better.

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LAGER

While cold storage of beer, “lagering”, in caves for example, was a common practice throughout the medieval period, bottom-fermenting yeast seems to have emerged as a hybridization in the early fifteenth century.

In the 19th century, prior to the advent of refrigeration, German brewers would dig cellars for lagering and fill them with ice from nearby lakes and rivers, which would cool the beer during the summer months. To further protect the cellars from the summer heat, they would plant chestnut trees, which have spreading, dense canopies but shallow roots which would not intrude on the caverns. The practice of serving beer at these sites evolved into the modern beer garden.[

The rise of lager was entwined with the development of refrigeration, as refrigeration made it possible to brew lager year-round (brewing in the summer had previously been banned in many locations across Germany), and efficient refrigeration also made it possible to brew lager in more places and keep it cold until serving.

Wikipedia

WEIZEN

Weizenbier or Hefeweizen, in the southern parts of Bavaria usually called Weißbier (literally “white beer”, but the name probably derives from Weizenbier, “wheat beer”), is a beer, traditionally from Bavaria, in which a significant proportion of malted barley is replaced with malted wheat. By German law, Weißbiers brewed in Germany must be top-fermented. Specialized strains of yeast are used which produce overtones of banana and clove as by-products of fermentation. Weißbier is so called because it was, at the time of its inception, paler in color than Munich’s traditional brown beer. It is well known throughout Germany, though better known as Weizen (“Wheat”) outside Bavaria. The terms Hefeweizen (“yeast wheat”) or Hefeweißbier refer to wheat beer in its traditional, unfiltered form. The term Kristallweizen (crystal wheat), or kristall Weiß (crystal white beer), refers to a wheat beer that is filtered to remove the yeast and wheat proteins which contribute to its cloudy appearance.

Wikipedia

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PILSNER

The city of Pilsen began brewing in 1295, but until the mid-1840s, most Bohemian beers were top-fermented. The taste and standards of quality often varied widely, and in 1838, consumers dumped whole barrels to show their dissatisfaction. The officials of Pilsen founded a city-owned brewery in 1839, called Měšťanský pivovar Plzeň (German: Bürger-Brauerei, English: Citizens’ Brewery – now Pilsner Urquell), which was to brew beer in the pioneering Bavarian style. Brewers had begun aging beer made with cool fermenting yeasts in caves (lager, i.e., German: gelagert [stored]), which improved the beer’s clarity and shelf-life. Part of this research benefited from the knowledge already expounded on in a book (printed in German in 1794, in Czech in 1799), written by Czech brewer František Ondřej Poupě (Ger: Franz Andreas Paupie) (1753–1805) from Brno.[5]

The Pilsen brewery recruited the Bavarian brewer Josef Groll (1813–1887) who, using new techniques and paler malts, presented his first batch of pale lager on 5 October 1842. The combination of brighter malt prepared by English technology, Pilsen’s remarkably soft water, local Saaz noble hops from nearby Žatec and Bavarian-style lagering produced a clear, golden beer that was regarded as a sensation. Groll returned to Vilshofen three years later in 1845, and there later inherited his father’s brewery.

Wikipedia

PORTER

In 1802 John Feltham wrote a version of the history of porter that has been used as the basis for most writings on the topic. Very little of Feltham’s story is backed up by contemporary evidence; his account is based on a letter written by Obadiah Poundage (who had worked for decades in the London brewing trade) in the 1760s. Feltham badly misinterpreted parts of the text, mainly due to his unfamiliarity with 18th-century brewing terminology.[6] Feltham claimed that in 18th-century London a popular beverage called three threads was made consisting of a third of a pint each of ale, beer and twopenny (the strongest beer, costing two pence a quart). About 1730, Feltham said, a brewer called Harwood made a single beer called Entire or Entire butt, which recreated the flavour of “three threads” and became known as “porter”.[7]

Porter is mentioned as early as 1721, but no writer before Feltham says it was made to replicate “three threads”. Instead, it seems to be a more-aged development of the brown beers already being made in London.[8] Before 1700, London brewers sent out their beer very young and any ageing was either performed by the publican or a dealer. Porter was the first beer to be aged at the brewery and dispatched in a condition fit to be drunk immediately. It was the first beer that could be made on any large scale, and the London porter brewers, such as Whitbread, Truman, Parsons and Thrale, achieved great success financially.

Wikipedia

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IPA

The pale ales of the early 18th century were lightly hopped and quite different from today’s pale ales. By the mid-18th century, pale ale was mostly brewed with coke-fired malt, which produced less smoking and roasting of barley in the malting process, and hence produced a paler beer. One such variety of beer was October beer, a pale well-hopped brew popular among the landed classes, who brewed it domestically; once brewed it was intended to cellar two years.

Among the first brewers known to export beer to India was George Hodgson’s[3] Bow Brewery, on the Middlesex-Essex border. Bow Brewery beers became popular among East India Company traders in the late 18th century because of the brewery’s location near the East India Docks[a] and Hodgson’s liberal credit line of 18 months. Ships transported Hodgson’s beers to India, among them his October beer, which benefited exceptionally from conditions of the voyage and was apparently highly regarded among its consumers in India.

Wikipedia

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Collaboration with Drifter Brewing

American Pale Ale is a collaboration between Table 58 Brewing and Drifter Brewing from Cape Town.  A great beer in our quest for excellence!